telescope1

Telescope Casual to be honored at Casual Living Conference

Telescope Casual to be honored at Casual Living Conference

107815-casual-living-header-logo

Telescope Casual, a Granville, N.Y.-based outdoor furniture manufacturer, will be recognized as Supplier of the Year at the fourth annual Casual Living Conference, “Inside Outdoor – Are You In It To Win It?,” set for Feb. 18-20, 2015 at the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Fla.

In business since 1903, Telescope recently has been transforming its production process to maximize efficiency to serve the ever-changing needs of the marketplace. Many of its 285 employees have been involved with the transformation process, which began last summer in conjunction with lean consulting group, Honsha, Inc., using the philosophies and principles learned at Toyota.

Telescope Casual CEO Kathy Juckett said she thinks employees at the factory, as well as dealers and sales reps, will be excited to learn of the honor, which will be presented at the All-Star Award dinner on the evening of Feb. 19.

“They’re going to be thrilled, absolutely thrilled because they’re working very hard not only just at their regular jobs, but with our transformation that we’re undergoing to become the premier mass customization facility,” Juckett said. “They’re doing a lot of extra things along the way, and to have some recognition from the industry means a lot.”

Kathy Juckett Telescope
Kathy Juckett, Telescope Casual CEO

Juckett went on to describe the initiative as “a complete and total cultural transformation of our entire facility.” The 111-year-old manufacturer was originally set up for mass production of products with very little variety. Over the past decade, consumer demand has caused the variety of its products to increase at an incredible rate. Non-value steps have been eliminated from its metal department, the company’s largest department. Juckett said sales reps who visited last week for the company’s annual sales meeting were astonished at the difference. “It’s basically been driven by what the customer wants,” Juckett said of the initiative.

Casual Living’s editorial and research staff nominates vendors for this annual award with the final winner selected from a vote by the committee as well as with input from key retailers of each supplier.

The vendors nominated are ones that best fit the criteria for the award, which honors manufacturers that “take their company and the industry as a whole to a new level through creativity, innovation and decisive and bold actions.”

Source: http://www.casualliving.com/article/494348-telescope-casual-be-honored-casual-living-conference

casual

Telescope Casual Furniture implementing lean manufacturing processes

GRANVILLE, N.Y. – Telescope Casual Furniture, a leading manufacturer and marketer of outdoor furniture, is launching a lean initiative to maximize its effectiveness in serving the ever-changing marketplace.

107815-casual-living-header-logo“Our facility was originally set up for big runs of very little variety,” said Kathy Juckett, CEO. “Over the past 10 years, consumer demand has caused the variety of our product offerings to increase at an incredible rate. In order to keep up and perform to our standards, we’ve brought in the help of Honsha, Inc, a premier lean consulting group. We are committed to executing the levels of quality, delivery, and customer service we pride ourselves on.”

Honsha Managing Partner Darril Wilburn said his San Diego-based company, which built a strong reputation by transforming companies using the TPS/Lean philosophy learned at Toyota, was excited to work with Telescope Casual Furniture to develop its lean capabilities. “TCF is a company with a great history and legacy,” he said. “As with many businesses, the market demands have evolved and its competitors have changed as a result of the global economy. Our job is to help TCF create a manufacturing system that is robust and flexible to meet current and future customer demands. We are working with TCF to apply lean concepts, principles and techniques which will deliver high quality, at the lowest cost in the shortest lead time to the customer. We’re really impressed by the excitement and engagement of all TCF employees in this process.”

Honsha is currently working with TCF on a project in its Metal department that will allow for quick changeovers, more flexibility and a reduction in work-in-process inventory. Another project in the Welding department will better utilize team member’s talents by reducing non-value added steps in the process. Over the next several months, additional focus areas will be tackled.

Telescope Casual Furniture has been producing quality furniture in the USA Since 1903 and has been based in Granville, N.Y. since 1921. As a leader in residential and commercial outdoor and casual furniture, Telescope offers high quality seating, tables, umbrellas, pool furniture and more, built to stand the test of time.

For over 100 years Telescope has remained a remarkably successful family owned business, managed by the fourth and fifth generation of the Vanderminden family who currently employ more than 300 workers.

Source: http://www.casualliving.com/article/490212-telescope-casual-furniture-implementing-lean-manufacturing-processes

telescope3

Casual Classics and Telescope Gain Honors

107815-casual-living-header-logoCasual classics furniture group will be recognized as Retailer of the Year and Telescope Casual as Supplier of the Year at the fourth annual Casual Living Conference. Set for Feb. 18-20 at the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Fla., the conference theme will be “Inside Outdoor – Are You In It To Win It?”

Industry honors will go to the Rancho Cordova, Calif.-based furniture buying group and the Granville, N.Y.-based outdoor furniture manufacturer at the All-Star Awards Dinner, to be held the evening of Feb. 19.

Just before the awards dinner, the International Casual Furnishings Association will organize roundtable discussions as retailers, manufacturers and sales reps share their perspectives on some of today’s most pressing industry issues.

The day will also include a presentation by Kent Panther, a vice president at Wray Ward, who will share effective marketing efforts and measurement metrics. For more than 25 years, Panther has cultivated expertise in measuring the results of marketing tactics, spending and ways to tie marketing to sales.

With the retail industry in the midst of a dramatic change as e-commerce captures the interest and dollars of more consumers, a panel of executives from leading e-tailers will share an insider’s view of selling outdoor furnishings online. Overstock.com’s Senior Director and General Merchandising Manager Ron Hilton and Ryan Fitzpatrick, who oversees the day-to-day management of Wayfair.com’s furniture and home décor business, will share their insights with retailers who want to add an e-commerce element to their strategy or find out the best practices for attracting consumers to their own websites.

Homsy
Homsy
Juckett
Juckett

In business a century before e-commerce, Telescope Casual recently has been transforming its production process to maximize efficiency to serve the ever-changing needs of the marketplace. Many of its 285 employees have been involved with the transformation process, which began last summer in conjunction with lean consulting group Honsha, Inc., using the philosophies and principles learned at Toyota.

Telescope Casual CEO Kathy Juckett said she thinks employees at the factory, as well as dealers and sales reps, will be excited by the recognition planned. “They’re going to be thrilled, absolutely thrilled because they’re working very hard not only just at their regular jobs, but with our transformation that we’re undergoing to become the premier mass customization facility,” Juckett said. “They’re doing a lot of extra things along the way, and to have some recognition from the industry means a lot.”

Buzz Homsy, director of the Casual Classics Furniture Group he founded in 2001 along with two other retailers, was confident the group’s 58 members will be excited to share the recognition as Retailer of the Year to honor the career they all have shared. The group represents nearly 190 casual furnishings stores throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and Canada.

The buying group was formed in response to competition from growing mass merchants like Home Depot, Costco and Sam’s Club. By leveraging the buying power of a member-owned group, they have been able to keep product affordable for their consumers and work with manufacturers to develop unique product to sell under an exclusive label. One of Casual Classics’ latest introductions is a proprietary grill, Sun Fire.

John Moore, the marketing guru who transformed Starbucks and Whole Foods into iconic global brands, will deliver the keynote address on the morning of Feb. 19. The day will continue with messages from outstanding interior designers who create outdoor living areas for clients and who design outdoor furnishings for manufacturers as well as panel discussions featuring full-line furniture retailers who also succeed in selling the outdoor category.

Casual Living’s editorial and research staff nominates vendors for the annual awards to retailers and suppliers recognized for their lasting impact on the casual/outdoor business with the final winner selected from a vote by the committee as well as with input from key retailers of each supplier. The vendors nominated are ones that best fit the criteria for the award, which honors manufacturers that “take their company and the industry as a whole to a new level through creativity, innovation and decisive and bold actions.”

Hear more about Casual Classics and Telescope Casual’s successful business strategies at the rapidly approaching conference. There is still time to register and be part of this exciting industry event. To register, visit http://casualliving.com/casualcon.

For more information, contact Casual Living Publisher Doug Dauray at ddauray@asualliving.com or Associate Publisher Kristin O’Brien at kobrien@casualliving.com.

Source: http://www.casualliving.com/article/515618-casual-classics-and-telescope-gain-honors

Kathy-Juckett-Table-rims-300x261

Telescope goes nimble

Telescope goes nimble
By Gordon Woodworth, Chronicle News Editor

After 111 years, Telescope Casual Furniture in Granville is in the midst of a culture change.

“We used to produce large amounts of a small number of products,” CEO Kathy Juckett told The Chronicle at the plant Tuesday. “Now we produce smaller amounts of a large number of products. We have gone from mass production to mass customization. This is a comprehensive change in our culture to bring our business maximum flexibility, and really to acknowledge that mass production was the way of the past.”

Telescope — and its 265 employees — are being remade into a more nimble, more efficient company with the help of Honsha, Inc., a consulting firm made up of former Toyota employees “teaching the Toyota way,” Mrs. Juckett said.

‘Can’t recall having this much fun.’

It started in May, and will likely continue for another year or more.

Telescope Casual Furniture CEO Kathy Juckett in the company's showroom in Granville. In addition to a new
Telescope Casual Furniture CEO Kathy Juckett in the company’s showroom in Granville. In addition to a new “lean initiative” to increase efficiency, she said they are now producing marine grade polymer outdoor furniture, including benches and Adirondack chairs.Chronicle photo/Gordon Woodworth

“I can’t remember when I had this much fun.” Mrs. Juckett said. “I’m tired, but we are already seeing the benefits of this change, and the logic working. This was the right thing for us to do. You can see it. You can feel it. You can taste it.”

“We are looking at everything and completely changing the way we manufacture,” she said. “It’s all based in logic. It’s all about identifying and removing everything that is waste, looking at every process and removing everything not necessary.”

Previously, Telescope would have separate areas where furniture parts were bent, punched and drilled. In between, parts would sit unused, awaiting processing.

Now, all those steps are done in a single “cell” of employees, eliminating moving the pieces around the factory floor.

“Raw materials go into a cell,” she said, “and when it comes out, it’s done and ready to be finished.

“We looked at the sequence of machines and minimized the changeovers and set-ups. Jobs have been grouped together, and now everything flows, and it enables us to manage a high level of variety very efficiently.”

Another example? “Our welders used to spend 40% of their time assembling,” Mrs. Juckett said. “Now we put one assembler with two welders. The welders weld and the assemblers assemble.”

A saw that cuts aluminum rods into smaller pieces sits near lanes of parts that feed the welders.

“The saw only runs when the lanes are empty,” she said. “I love how everything is visual. Everything flows to the welder. Before we made the change, you wouldn’t have been able to walk through this place.”

Welding fixtures are now arranged in order of highest usage, with the ones used the most closest to the welders.

Assembly stations are now set up before shifts so assemblers can get right to work.

“Before, they were spending a lot of time searching for tools,” Mrs. Juckett said. “Now they have everything they need right at their station.”

She said the change was driven by several factors, one being an influx of “billions of dollars of furniture from China. Because of that, we needed to become more customized and more specialized.”

Plus, Telescope has gotten into contract furniture, filling large orders for hotels and motels.

Telescope Casual Furniture CEO Kathy Juckett in the company's showroom in Granville. In addition to a new
The new “lean initiative” is already producing significant improvements in efficiency and productivity, said Telescope Casual Furniture CEO Kathy Juckett. Behind her are table rims that have been bent into circles and are waiting for the next step in production.

“That part of our business has seen substantial growth,” Mrs. Juckett said. “We have become a player. But the core of our business remains specialty retailers.”

Telescope makes furniture with thousands of combinations of finishes, fabrics, frames and frame finishes. Being able to move efficiently between jobs is essential, Mrs. Juckett said.

‘Customize to compete with China’

“People want choices,” Mrs. Juckett said. “They don’t want what everyone else gets at Lowe’s or Home Depot or Walmart. They want something unique to them.

“Customization is a way to compete with China. It’s the only advantage we have.”

She said they are a third of the way through the “lean” transformation, “and we are already seeing significant changes. This definitely works. Employees who have already gone through it see it. And employees who have yet to go through it are excited, because they see results in other areas.

“This will be a permanent change. The system works because there are huge continuous improvement factors built in. You are constantly evaluating your processes, and because of that you are continuing to improve.

“As a business, if you don’t change, if you don’t keep up with what is going on, you won’t survive. And change is particularly complicated here, where things have been set in stone for 111 years.

“I am always telling our employees that the one thing that they can count on is change. We won’t change for the sake of changing, but we will change if it helps move us forward, and that’s what we’re doing.”

Copyright © 2014 Lone Oak Publishing Co., Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://glensfallschronicle.com/telescope-goes-nimble/

sammy

What obstructs the implementation in Lithuania of the system that earned the success for Toyota manufacturing plants?

What obstructs the implementation in Lithuania of the system that earned the success for Toyota manufacturing plants?

Familiar with the Lean management system (better known as the Lean method) since the age of 17, Sammy Obara, managing director of Honsha, constantly visits Lithuania and helps the local companies to implement the famous management system, developed by Toyota. Yet the specialist agrees that the business culture is still a problem when implementing this method in Lithuania.

delfi

The Lean method in manufacturing companies originated in Japan and was known as the Toyota Management System. It was this car manufacturer that succeeded in improving its manufacturing process management by developing its own management system. Lithuanian companies have also become keen on adopting it. However, is it possible for a Japanese company management method, oriented towards low costs and high productivity, to be smoothly implemented in the Lithuanian business environment?

S. Obara, who is now consulting Lithuanian companies, became familiar with the Lean system while being a teenager. The youngster got a position as a trainee and was sent to Japan to learn the Toyota Management System. Later, S. Obara was offered a job in a new Toyota manufacturing plant in Venezuela. After that, he worked in Brazil.

The consultant, residing in the USA, made his first visit to Lithuania 4 years ago. He worked with the company Mars Lietuva at that time. S. Obara said that European minded people, able to boast a good education, surprised him in Lithuania.

Not for kicking out

The expert of the Lean system worked with some 10 companies in Lithuania. In the near future it is projected to implement the Lean system when cooperating with the governmental institutions of Lithuania. S. Obara has experience in implementing the Toyota system in the public sector in the USA, East Timor and Brazil.

When asked about the business environment of the former Soviet Union countries, S. Obara noticed that the employees of local companies seemed obedient, avoiding opposition and refraining from expressing their own opinion at first; however, the progress in this field is already visible in Lithuania. The companies that follow the Lean method are particularly determined to implement the importance of employees’ proposals, ideas and solutions.

Although the Lean system helps the companies to cut unnecessary costs and make their activities more efficient, it is still being criticized due to the stress brought to the employees, resulting from the introduction of changes in the company. S. Obara claims that employees will never avoid stress, but it is important to choose the type of the stress to be felt.

sammy

© DELFI (Photo by T.Vinickas)

Of course, people are afraid of losing their jobs. We can talk about two types of stress here. The first one is the stress that is felt when the company wants to avoid losses and unprofitable activity. This requires a huge load of work and the stress is felt accordingly. Another type of stress emerges when nothing is being done and it is preferred to stay in the comfort zone. In this case people are afraid to lose their jobs because the company is becoming increasingly less productive and sooner or later redundancy becomes a real threat. Thus it is much better to direct the stress towards the improvement of the work environment and productivity, maintained S. Obara.

Can it be that while devoting all its energy towards the reduction of its losses or ineffective activity, a company gives up its opportunities to invest and experiment into a possible future success?

This method (Lean – ed.) allows the achievement of growth without hiring additional staff. For example, if a company will need 20 per cent less employees for the manufacturing of a product, it can direct these capacities towards enhancing sales. This system is good when companies want to grow, but it does not suit, when the only wish is just to get rid of employees, S. Obara said. According to the consultant, successful leadership and employee’s inclusion into the process of making the company more effective are prerequisites of good implementation of the system.

Cultural environment obstructs implementation of the system in Lithuania

Associate Professor at the ISM University of Management and Economics Dr Vytautas Būda, whose field of interest is lean management, said that the cultural environment becomes the main obstacle when implementing the Lean system in Lithuania.

Based on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions survey, the society of Lithuania is a hierarchical patriarchal one. This means that our managers do not risk asking the opinion of subordinates, the latter waits for orders from above and avoids expressing the dissatisfaction, while the managers accept the proposals for development as personal criticism, he commented.

According to the Associate Professor, the key structure of the Lean system is not only the horizontal cooperation but the vertical one as well. In Japanese it is called “genchi gembutsu”, i.e. if a problem arises at the machine-tools in the manufacturing shop, it must be solved right there.

Cultural differences in the companies may be illustrated by the number of development proposals from one employee. In manufacturing plants in Japan this number is 62 proposals from one employee, in Japanese manufacturing plants located in the USA this number is 1.4, while in American or European manufacturing plant this number is only 0.4.

Therefore, when wishing to implement the Lean management system, managers must commit to transferring to subordinate levels not only a part of their responsibility, but the powers as well, and to realize that the problems are best seen by those, who directly work at the machine-tools, V. Būda explained.

When asked to comment on shortcomings of the Lean system, Associate Professor at the University of Vilnius Faculty of Economics Dr Dalius Serafinas also stressed the cultural differences.

The system originates from Japan. The culture is different there. It is a stable culture and one does not need to persuade managers on the importance of effectiveness, employees’ motivation, the submission of their proposals and the ability of managers to be leaders, he said.

According to the lecturer at the university, the lack of basic environment (reporting, accountability) obstructs the implementation of the Lean system in Lithuanian companies very often.

D. Serafinas underlined, that too little attention is paid to the employees in some companies of the country, as it is thought that the manager knows everything and thus the processes are not coordinated with the employees sufficiently enough.

Ugnė Karaliūnaitė,
www.DELFI.lt
April 8, 2014, 7:29 pm

Source: http://www.delfi.lt/verslas/verslas/kas-trukdo-lietuvoje-diegti-toyota-gamykloms-sekme-atnesusia-sistema.d?id=64420426

learn

Carlos Fukamizu: When the Company is Managed by a Method Rather than an Individual

Verslo zinios Lithuania interviews Carlos Fukamizu – October 2012

Carlos Fukamizu: When the Company is Managed by a Method Rather than an Individual

Strategy: Productivity can increase up to 350% if the work processes are organized well

More production in shorter time – a “Lean” production method is famous by this management
philosophy. It became fashionable already to implement this method in Lithuania, but it should
become a standard in order to obtain benefits from the investments.

Carlos Fukamizu, a member of the association Honsha which joins former Toyota experts and
managers, expert of the Lean system, declares, – “A client should not pay for the production
drawbacks and wastes. A client is God, therefore sometimes it is necessary to take care of him
more than usual. Company’s duty is to take care of that.” Carlos visit to Lithuania was regarding
the partnership between Honsha and “Lean.lt”, as well as taking into account the needs of the
Lithuania companies to learn more about this method.

After over 20 years of lean experience at the Toyota company, Mr. Fukamizu points out that the
lean method is something more than just philosophy. Former Toyota engineer says,- “Many
companies just ignore a “Lean” method since they do not understand it. However, it should
become actually the way of life and guidelines to everybody, from the manager to a front-line
worker. Reading a book or attending 80 hours long seminar is not sufficient. The employees
should be trained on a continuous basis in order to detect the chances for improvement and
eliminate wastes in the production chain. This method should be a root from which a plant
would grow.”

It can be used everywhere and by everybody.

One of the “Lean” features is a change of way of thinking, and therefore the following rule is
applied in the Toyota divisions: “I always think how to do my work better.”

The lean expert says, – “Gradually all employees become the self-training coachers. The
employees of Toyota think not only about the improvement of their individual efficiency, but also
about the issues of production, quality, safety, and administration. If an employee performs his
work in 5 seconds less time, it is a good result, but if the whole team achieves this, the results
are much better.” If this philosophy is implemented the company is being managed by the
strategy rather than by an individual.”

“Lean” means a system which includes different methods and tools such as 5S (visual workplace
management), Kaizen (continuous improvement), standardized operations, SMED (change-over
time reduction), TPM (total productive maintenance), Kanban (inventory scheduling system),
VSM (value stream mapping), A3 (planning), Hoshin Kanri (strategic planning/strategic
management). Mr. Fukamizu points out, – “For example, using SMED methodology Toyota has
reduced the change-over time from 3 hours down to 7 minutes. Time and resources are wasted
both by large and small companies, so the size of the company does not play an important role.
Lean methods can be used also to manage your personal life. You should just use your brain.”

It is a standard rather than fashion.

Vidas Petraitis, the manager of “Lean.lt”, says that efficient use of the system starts by
establishing weak points of the process. For example, somebody walks around in vain and
repeats the same tasks. If such activity does not create added value, Lean methodology can
be called for assistance.

Mr. Petraitis explains,- “It is possible to hammer in the nail into the board with the brick as well,
but bricks are usually used for the construction. The most useful tool should be chosen for each
case. According to this philosophy, one should always target for better results and solve emerging
problems.”

According to Mr. Petraitis, majority of Lithuanian companies consider this method as a fashion,
whilst Western countries apply it as a standard. However, Lithuanian companies also develop
their attitudes, they are interested and try to apply the system on their own or address
consultants for assistance.

Comment:
Alvydas Tamosiunas, SPS coordinator, UAB “Schmitz Cargobull Baltic”

We are implementing the system starting from the end of 2005, and the results are already evident.
Productivity of the assemble line increased by 350%. Assemble of one tractor vehicle required 10
workers earlier, while only 4 people are engaged in the process now. This was achieved only thanks
to good organization of work, with no investments or purchase of new equipment. Our thinking also
changed with the implementation of this method. We thought earlier that an employee was to be
blamed if the work results were bad. However, we do not blame anybody now, we prefer to clarify
the reasons of the fault, and try to detect errors. People feel that they are valuated more, desire for
challenges emerged. When we used to receive a large order 6 years before, everybody was
concerned and anxious about the production success, while now any new challenge inspires joy.
It is not sufficient to copy the “Lean” method if you want to use it. Stagnation will overwhelm if you
will receive knowledge but will not do anything. When we started to think over, what we are doing
improperly and what should be changed, we understood that this is very individual. Moreover, it is
continuous process without an end. A simple advice could be made to the companies which do
not use such system – a lot depends upon the philosophy of the manager and company. You can
start teaching and urging the employees, but the things will begin to change only when the
management will deeply infected by this methodology. Also, after the first failures you should not
disappoint and blame the system. You should try and try again, for the real results will appear only
after 3-4 years of a stubborn work.

More information:
http://laikrastis.vz.lt/index.php?act=mprasa&sub=article&id=55037#ixzz2ADd0YLhb – See more at: http://www.honsha.org/MediaCenter/MediaCenter.aspx?cod=160#sthash.DNUt0MKA.dpuf